New military policy resurrects long-held concerns

December 23, 2010

New military policy resurrects long-held concerns

by Nancy Thorner

“As in 1993, allowing gay to serve openly prompts the same discussion”

If all goes as planned, President Obama will sign legislation today to repeal the military ban on homosexuals often referred to as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” 

It was President Bill Clinton who pledged to end the military’s ban against homosexuals.  Compromise legislation was passed in 1993, dubbed as “don’t ask, don’t tell,” which permitted homosexuals to serve in the military if they kept their lifestyles private. 

In a Heritage report published on July 1, 1993, John Luddy warns of three detrimental effects of lifting the ban of homosexuals serving in the military through compromise legislation.

1.  “Unit cohesion is weakened.

2.  Professionalism is undermined.

3.  Risk of AIDS in the services is increased.”

John Luddy goes on to say on to say that “the military is to win wars, not to conduct liberal social experiments. . . The issue is not one of fairness, but of military effectiveness.”

Further stated by Luddy, “War is fought by units, not by individuals.  Units function best when differences among individuals are kept to a minimum.  It is not fair to risk the lives of American soldiers and sailors merely to accommodate the sexual lifestyles of certain individuals.”  http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/1993/07/em359nbsp-the-military-gay-ban?query=The+Military+Gay+Ban:+Why+Don%252527t+Ask+Don%252527t+Tell+Don%252527t+Work

Also published in 1993 was a Pentagon report which concluded that homosexuality was incompatible with military service. 

Existing for the past 17 years is a contradiction of a policy that allows homosexuals to serve as long as they keep their sexual activity private, in contrast to the findings of the 1993 Pentagon report.

The implication of ending “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” will not be immediately known.  There are already predictions of a shortfall in recruiting and retention by those contemplating enlistmentment or who are already in the military and who believe that the promotion of homosexuality, which is anti-family, is contrary to the law of God. 

Recently a special Defense Department group appointed by Defense Secretary Robert recommended that the military should expressly prohibit heterosexuals from using separate showers, bathrooms and bunking facilities when the repeal goes into effect.

Now that the Lame Duck Congress has repealed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” might patriotic alumni who were so in favor of ending DADT now write to their college presidents to insist on quick action to allow the ROTC on their college campuses.  “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was given as the excuse offered by Harvard, Yale and Columbia in recent years to keep the ROTC at arm’s length. 

The three detrimental effects of sanctioning gays to serve in the military as listed in John Luddy’s 1993 Heritage report also hold true today.  Regarding the spreading of AIDS, the assumption behind “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” was that military personnel will abstain from sexual activity.  How naive an assumption!

Political correctness and the the desire to placate those who wish to promote the homosexual lifestyle both inside and outside the military is irresponsible and detrimental to our society. 

My newly elected Illinois senator, Mark Kirk, was one of six Republicans who voted to homosexualize our military.  As such Senator Kirk voted to take a giant step in transforming the Armed Forces through social engineering as a forum to promote homosexuality as an acceptable lifestyle. 

Is this a time to promote social engineering in the military?  In a time of war, the main concern of legislators should be to rally around what it will take to win the war. 

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